Friday, July 11, 2014

University of Pennsylvania receives $10 M Superfund asbestos site to study

Dr. Ian Blair, Professor of Pharmacology, has been appointed the Director of the Centre and CEET Director Dr. Trevor Penning, Professor of Pharmacology, has been Deputy Director of the Center.

Additional investigators on the grant are researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center, the Penn School of Arts and Sciences, and Fox Chase Cancer Center.

According to a press release CEET's community outreach and engagement core participated in bi-directional communication with the Ambler community for the past five years, but this award is powered the first NIEHS Superfund grant, the problems, at a community-academic partnership.

The Ambler community housed a now-closed asbestos factory since the late 1880s catapulted several studies focusing on the medical and ecological consequences of the factory.

Because residents in the area faced an increased risk for asbestos and possible asbestos-related diseases, experts have tried to find answers to the toxic fiber and its impact on society.

With the help of the CEET community outreach and engagement core, the Pennsylvania Department of health found that an increased rate of mesothelioma cases compared to nearby zip codes area has occurred. She thinks that women a higher risk than men.

The grant is also an interdisciplinary training program for students. It combines environmental science with environmental and health sciences, so that doctoral students and postdoctoral of fellows can receive practical training in these complementary disciplines.

Participation in webinars NIEHS Superfund and internships in technology transfer to CTT and the EPA sponsored will be part of the training.

Focusing on the rehabilitation of asbestos particles are environmental science projects by DRS. Jane Willenbring and Brenda Casper conducted by the school of Arts and Sciences. The two Mycrorrhiza are fungi to break asbestos fibers, a new mineral use non-toxic form.

The studies on mobility and fate of asbestos particles into natural waters such as streams and rivers, performed by Dr. Doug Jerolmack and Willenbring of the school of Arts and Sciences. It monitors the movement of asbestos fibres through floor and replaced with translucent ground water and a Nano Aquarium to detect asbestos in the environment.

Fran Barg and Ted Emmett von Penn Medicine leads a sociological study to identify how asbestos occurs and whether such findings of the cluster of mesothelioma asbestos-induced cases in Ambler, could explain specifically for women.

In addition the biomedical branch of the grant investigate the genetics of susceptibility to mesothelioma and plans to develop a blood test for the early detection with a mouse model of mesothelioma.

DRS. Becky Simmons of Penn Medicine, and Joseph Testa of Fox Chase works with a tumor suppressor knockout mouse, whether susceptibility to mesothelioma is genetic.

The mouse model will also be used to test whether the need to asbestos is less toxic.

DRS. Medicine study Melpo Christofidou-Solomidou and Steve Albelda von Penn as mesothelioma in mice to prevent an antioxidant in flaxseed with asbestos exposure. They will also use the flax seed to treat the mice when they show early symptoms of mesothelioma.

Blair and Anil Vachani develop a blood test do to determine whether subjects were exposed, asbestos and whether they are at risk for developing mesothelioma with blood samples from workers, strongly exposed to the asbestos.

During the projects first and foremost concentrate on Ambler, believes the Centre which could easily translate findings to the 15 additional asbestos Superfund sites in the country.

From legal Newsline: Reach Heather Isringhausen Gvillo on the asbestos@legalnewsline.com


University of Pennsylvania receives $10 M Superfund asbestos site to study

Asbestos was found in the ceiling of the Stamford Police station

Rick Kornak provides sharp news and interesting articles for the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance. Bio.

Rick Kornak

June 16, 2014

Stamford, Connecticut - asbestos contractor discovered after a CVC in the plaster ceiling of the first floor of the Stamford Police post last month, has decided to stop the building air conditioning and officers circulation system. Approach of summer and the heat intensifies, agents working at the station are increasingly uncomfortable.

"There is no movement of the air," the head of the Police Jon Fontneau said. "It is not an excellent location at all. We worry what will happen on the really hot days because guys are sweating dramatically this time. »

According to engineer the city Lou Casolo, after the discovery of asbestos, consultant in industrial hygiene was hired by the city to test the quality of air in the police station. During four hours of tests, all the samples came back negative for contamination by asbestos. The police Union also hired a consultant, and these samples came back negative as well.

Before the test, responsible for the city's Stamford had begun to grow concerned about the livability of the station. Mayor David Martin has begun to consider the movement of officials of the Ministry until the asbestos removal has been done. "We were sweating bullets that essentially the police could not work outside the police station", said the Mayor. Now that tests show no cause for concern, police will be more likely to remain at the station.

Although the building has been deemed worthy of the occupation, Casolo said that the ceiling of plaster containing asbestos should not be disturbed. When friable asbestos becomes airborne, it can be easily inhaled. Asbestos exposure leads to many health problems breathing and is the main cause of mesothelioma. Despite the ban on asbestos, there are about 3,000 made mesothelioma diagnoses every year.

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Asbestos was found in the ceiling of the Stamford Police station

The case awarded $4.5 million asbestos plaintiffs are reverse Verdict

Philadelphia - a verdict of guilty of 2011 in an asbestos case against Foster Wheeler Corporation was reversed on June 26 by the Pennsylvania an appellate court. Judge Superior Court Jack A. Penella written opinion that an act of inadmissible rest seekers claims against the company.

David and Frances Graver filed their lawsuit against six different accused after M. burn, now deceased, was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a type of cancer, mostly caused by exposure to asbestos. Mesothelioma has a very low survival rate, and it is difficult to diagnose due to its latent character and generic symptoms.

Mr. burn was employed in the power of Pennsylvania and Central light steam Holtwood from 1983 until 2010. The prosecution argued that Mr burn has been exposed to toxin by contact with a boiler of Foster Wheeler asbestos-containing.

The stalls were awarded a combined $4.5 million in December 2011. This amount was to be apportioned among the six defendants, leaving the responsibility for $750,000 of Foster Wheeler. Both parties appealed the decision: applicants because they asked for additional compensation. the defendant due to the status of rest which would exclude the possibility of the stalls to continue. The Court of Appeal agreed with Foster Wheeler.

Statutes of bar of rest all lawsuits at the latest 12 years after the completion of the 'improvement' - in this case, the mark Foster Wheeler boiler in question, which was completed in 1955. As a result, Mr. burn had until 1967 to commence his trial and has not done until 2010.

To prevent the verdict be reversed, the applicants argued that the requirement applies in this case, not a status of rest, but judge Panetta disagreed. He made a distinction between the two, explaining, "the limitation period applies to the only business resulting from alleged asbestos exposure. On the other hand, the relevant law of rest has greater scope and involves all claims against those involved in the design, planning, supervision or construction of any improvement to a building. »


The case awarded $4.5 million asbestos plaintiffs are reverse Verdict

Flawed licensing system may have led to asbestos exposure, Say Portlanders of southeastern

Rick Kornak provides sharp news and interesting articles for the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance. Bio.

Rick Kornak

June 20, 2014

Portland, Oregon - students of Duniway school Southeast of Portland may have been exposed to asbestos during the partial demolition of a neighboring House. Now, inhabitants of the region have expressed the desire for the city to take measures to give priority to the asbestos regulations.

"The problem is really at the level of the city," said Neighborhood Association Eastmoreland President Robert McCullough, whose goal is to convince the Advisory Committee's review of development of the need for a revision. "The city has lost interest in these issues of workings."

Currently, Portland doesn't require manufacturers to prove that asbestos has been contained or removed before the issuance of a permit, it is necessary for manufacturers to notify neighbors of demolition or imminent renovation projects. In addition, a demolition permit is not necessary unless the current structure is completely demolished, including its foundation. Since the residence on the rue de S. E. Rex has been partially dismantled, no permit was required.

This is an example of what the Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association considers a defective system.

The city of Portland does not regulate the handling of asbestos; This task is for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Because two separate entities are responsible for, all violations are often unknown until after that exposure has already occurred, as was the case with the House near Duniway school. Any renovation or demolition project is supposed to be inspected by the Department of Environmental Quality, before the start of the project. No such inspection was made the E Rex Street home.

"The system as it is does not work," said the Member of the Neighborhood Association Eastmoreland Kimberley Koehler. "We do the work of the city."

Asbestos exposure is the main cause of mesothelioma - a type of lung cancer that is almost always fatal. Although asbestos was banned in the 1970s, many old houses, such as the one located on the street S. E. Rex, contain the hazardous substance.

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Flawed licensing system may have led to asbestos exposure, Say Portlanders of southeastern

Defendant in the case of asbestos can have no Plea Deal removed due to claims of Innocence

Rick Kornak provides sharp news and interesting articles for the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance. Bio.

Rick Kornak

June 23, 2014

County of Merced, California - County of Merced prosecutors announced their intention to withdraw from the agreement with Rudy Buendia III, one of the three men who pleaded guilty "" of violating the Federal law of asbestos. The decision comes after Buendia repeatedly expressed his innocence to the members of the community, including the Merced County District Attorney Deputy Walter Wall, to whom he would have said, 'you know, I've done this,' when the two saw each other in public.

Merced County District Attorney Larry Morse II explained why prosecutors were planning to file a motion to withdraw the plea. "We are not in the habit of taking [guilty or no contest] means those which maintenance their innocence," he said. "" You can't do a plea and then turn around and say that ' I didn't do it. ".

The charges followed an incident in which Buendia, former co-owner of the nonprofit organization non profit defunct firm building, employee of the students to remove asbestos during a renovation project at the training centre automobile trade centre Castle between late 2005 and early 2006.

The arrangement was to provide an opportunity for students to gain work experience on the spot; Instead, they have been exposed to harmful toxins which can lead to many problems of respiratory health, including mesothelioma.

"I am frankly very tired of hearing about poor Rudy Buendia," said walrus. "Should focus on the children who have been exposed to asbestos because [al. Buendia] were over their heads financially and seeks to cut some corners. Buendia is certainly not a victim; children who were exposed were the victims. »

The plea agreement would have sent Buendia in prison for 24 months; now, he faces about 60 complaints and could serve more than 30 years in prison if the motion is granted and the case goes to court.

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Defendant in the case of asbestos can have no Plea Deal removed due to claims of Innocence

Judge Does not accept expert testimony as fresh evidence in the case of asbestos widow

Rick Kornak provides sharp news and interesting articles for the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance. Bio.

Rick Kornak

June 26, 2014

Seattle, Washington - the widow case against Marine Services Co. LLC manufacturer denied the revision after having initially ended in mistrial. Joanne K. Lipson, whose husband died of mesothelioma, said that "hot tops" - an insulation product manufactured by on Marine Services - contained asbestos. Mrs. Lipson has alleged that her husband came in contact with 'hot summits' and has been exposed to asbestos during his time working in a steel mill.

During the trial, maritime services argued that asbestos at the top hot society degraded and detoxified during the steelmaking process. Order to have the case reconsidered, Mrs. Lipson has offered expert testimony indicating that "significant quantities" of asbestos suffered the heat. Judge James L. Robart would not accept evidence as new evidence, noting that the Court is "concerned not with the correctness of the conclusions of the expert, but the robustness of the methodology.

J. Robart was referring to the fact that the evidence could not be considered as new if it was in possession of the applicant at the time of the trial, or if it could be discovered through research. Data such as the temperatures of molten steel and in which the asbestos fibres degrade, it is "certainly something which [Mrs. Lipson] could have discovered with reasonable diligence.

"Absence of new evidence, the event of the trial is not an opportunity for the parties to discuss gaps in their cases identified during the first trial," judge Robart wrote in his opinion.

Asbestos exposure is the main cause of mesothelioma. Despite the ban on asbestos for decades, there are about 3,000 made mesothelioma diagnoses every year.

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Judge Does not accept expert testimony as fresh evidence in the case of asbestos widow